smithsgrovesanitarium:

Watching this last night I found myself imagining the audiences screaming when they first saw the monster, back in 1931.

smithsgrovesanitarium:

Watching this last night I found myself imagining the audiences screaming when they first saw the monster, back in 1931.

Reblogged from Monster Nation
no idea why I did this

no idea why I did this

vintagegal:

Colin Clive and Boris Karloff on the set of Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

vintagegal:

Colin Clive and Boris Karloff on the set of Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Reblogged from

dishearteningmediocrity:

There’s so little information on Colin Clive out there that I feel compelled to share whatever I come across. He appears here in a short excerpt from Fires of Spring, the memoir of journalist Noël Barber. Barber, a boy in Hull at the time (c. 1923-25), recounts his experience playing “a village idiot” in A.A. Milne’s The Romantic Age with the Hull Repertory Company. He describes his part as “a succession of long-drawn out ‘Ooooh’s’ throughout the second act.” Colin, it seems, had a rather more substantial role:

“My big scene was with a quiet, very good-looking young man called Colin Clive. He had a deep, attractive, clipped voice. I liked him from the very start when he said, wearily:

‘God! What a life this is!’

Rehearsals took a fortnight—thank goodness. And then, when the great night came, Colin made me up, put the sweet-smelling greasepaint on my face, the touches of colour to my eyelids. And then, the audience were laughing—yes, laughing and clapping. And I was in the wings, and Arthur Whatmore [director of the Hull Repertory] pushed me and said: ‘Go on—get inside there—the first thing you’ve got to learn is to take an extra curtain.’

After the show we all went for bacon and eggs, and sat watching for the morning papers. They came out about half-past one. There were pleasantly long articles in the usual style of the provincial Press. Colin was praised magnificently, Arthur Whatmore was extolled. And at the end, one kindly old gentleman wrote: ‘Master Barber, who I understand is a local boy, gave a performance which shows he has great promise.’

Oooh!

Years later, I saw Colin Clive again. By then, we had both gone our roads, he on the stage, I writing. He had behind him his magnificent triumph of Journey’s End—he had in front of him Hollywood, a bitter disillusionment and a sudden, lonely death.

He was earning two or three hundred a week then at least. But he still wore grey flannels, and he still said, wearily: ‘God! What a life this is!’

We had bacon and eggs again that night.”

Bless you for posting this!

Reblogged from Smith Skylark
vanguardcinema:

Bride of Frankenstein (1935, James Whale) Whale turned up the juice (check out all those electrical arcs in the birth-of-the-bride scene) for the sequel to his Frankenstein, introducing wickedly witty new characters to concoct a mate for Boris Karloff’s monster.  Imbued with an emotional resonance and crackpot humor that the first film hinted at, Bride is a true classic.

vanguardcinema:

Bride of Frankenstein (1935, James Whale) Whale turned up the juice (check out all those electrical arcs in the birth-of-the-bride scene) for the sequel to his Frankenstein, introducing wickedly witty new characters to concoct a mate for Boris Karloff’s monster.  Imbued with an emotional resonance and crackpot humor that the first film hinted at, Bride is a true classic.

Reblogged from Vanguard Cinema
bettiebanshee:

Boris Karloff taking a break during the filming of Bride of Frankenstein.

bettiebanshee:

Boris Karloff taking a break during the filming of Bride of Frankenstein.

Reblogged from Bettie Banshee
Clarinet